Level 2 Hypnosis Course, Tentative Schedule Content 

 

This course is designed to enhance your knowledge and skills in clinical hypnosis.  Prior clinical hypnosis training is required such as an approved ASCH Level 1 course.  Focus will be placed on advancing skills and confidence with elicitations, reorienting, and integrating hypnotic applications into practice, along with several supervised practice opportunities.  Hypnotic applications include exploratory strategies such as ideomotor signaling, an introduction to ego state therapy, applications for children or child states, trauma, habit disorders, anxiety, sleep, and somatic concerns including pain management. 

ALL TIMES IN CENTRAL TIME ZONE 

DAY 1: Friday (8.5 hours- 1.5 hours break= 7)

 

9:00 am to 10:30 am

Review and Advancing Skills in Elicitations

 

Content:

 

Demonstration of hypnotic elicitations/inductions.  Discussion of indications and contraindications and how to tailor elicitations depending on individual clients/clinical concerns. Practice of elicitations.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Name two hypnotic elicitations, their individual indications and contraindications.

  • Discuss one indication and one contraindication for utilizing a specific elicitation.

  • Facilitate at least one intermediate level elicitation.

  • Evoke, deepen/intensify, utilize, and reorient from a trance experience.

 

References:

Barabasz, A., & Watkins, JG. (2005). Hypnotherapeutic Techniques 2E. New York, NY:

Brunner-Routlege.

Lankton, S. (2017). Training in therapy – induction without scripts. American Journal of

Clinical Hypnosis, 59 (3), 276-281.

Meyerson, J. (2017). Self-talk monitoring and utilization for enhancing hypnotic

induction. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 60 (2), 149-158.

 

10:30 to 10:45 Break

 

10:45 to 12:15 pm

Enhancing your Hypnotic Language: Creating Metaphors and Crafting Effective Suggestions for Change

 

Content:

Demonstration and experience of principles of constructing therapeutic metaphors.

Demonstration and practice of formulating effective therapeutic suggestions.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Demonstrate the construction of a therapeutic metaphor to be used as a hypnotic suggestion.

  • Provide at least two examples of effective therapeutic hypnotic suggestions to aid in facilitating therapeutic change

  • Describe the process of collaboratively creating metaphors and suggestions to promote desired change.

  • Formulate a therapeutic metaphor based on a clinical case.

 

References:

Lankton, C., & Lankton, S. (1989). Tales of Enchantment. Goal-Oriented Metaphors for Adults and Children in Therapy. New York: Brunner Mazel.

Rosen, S. (1982). My Voice Will Go With You. The Teaching Tales of Milton H. Erickson. New York: Norton.

Wallas, L. (1985). Stories for the Third Ear. Using Hypnotic Fables in Psychotherapy. New York: Norton.

Handel, D.L., & Neron, S. (2017). Cancer palliation: layered hypnotic approaches

mending symptoms, minding hope, and meaning. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 65 (2), 33-49.

Spiegel, S. (2014). Current issues in the treatment of specific phobia: recommendations

for innovative applications of hypnosis. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 56(4),389-404.

 

12:15 to 1:15 Lunch

 

1:15 to 2:15 pm

Giving a voice to the Unconscious:  Ideomotor Movement and Signaling as an Exploratory Technique

 

Content:

Discussion of ideomotor movement and demonstration of ideomotor finger signaling. Introduction of Cheek & LeCron’s exploratory ideomotor keys.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify at least 3 components of ideomotor questioning/exploration.

  • Introduce ideomotor signaling to a patient.

  • Discuss indications and counter-indications for the use of ideomotor exploration.

  • Demonstrate ideomotor signaling.

 

References:

Cheek, D.B., & LeCron, L.M. (1968). Clinical Hypnotherapy. New York, NY: Grune and

Stratton.

Ewin, D. M., & Eimer, B.N. (2006). Ideomotor signals for rapid hypnoanalysis. Springfield,

IL: Charles C. Thomas.

Cheek, D.B., (1994). Hypnosis: The Application of Ideomotor Techniques Boston,

Massachusetts, Allyn and Bacon.

Erickson, M. H. (1961). Historical note on the hand levitation and other ideomotor

techniques. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 3: 196

Watkins, J.G. (1992). Hypnoanalytic Techniques. New York, New York, Irvington

Publishers.

 

2:15 to 4:15

Small Group Practice 1: Facilitating Hypnotic Phenomena & Enhancing Skills

 

Content:

Participants practice techniques to elicit, intensify, utilize, and reorient from

trance.  Utilization of ideomotor signaling, metaphors and hypnotic suggestions for ego strengthening.  Faculty and participants will give feedback.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Practice at least once being the facilitator, subject, and observer.

  • Demonstrate at least one example of hypnotic phenomenon.

  • Utilize at least one ideomotor signaling technique.

  • Construct at least one indirect suggestion for ego strengthening.

 

References:

Alladin, A. (2013). Healing the wounded self: combining hypnotherapy with ego

state therapy. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 56 (1), 3-22.

Kluft, R.P. (2012). Approaches to difficulties in realerting subjects from hypnosis.

American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 55 (2), 140-159.

Barabasz, A., & Barabasz, M. (2016). Induction technique: beyond simple response

to suggestion. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 59 (2), 204-213.

 

4:15 to 5:30

Hypnotic strategies based on Ego State therapy principles for the treatment of trauma.

 

Content:

Accessing/communicating with unconscious ego states, working with ego states for symptom management and improved functioning, and affect regulation, and managing traumatic memories.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Name at least three principles of Ego State Therapy.

  • Describe at least two hypnotic applications based on those principles.

  • Participants will be able to construct three hypnotic suggestions for accessing ego states.

  • Participants will be able to formulate two Ego State Therapy based suggestions for affect regulation.

 

References:

Lemke, W. (2005). Utilizing Hypnosis and Ego-State Therapy to Facilitate Healthy

Adaptive Differentiation in the Treatment of Sexual Disorders. The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 47(3):179-89.

Phillips, M., & Frederick, C. (2010). Empowering the self through ego-state therapy.

Available at http://www.reversingchronicpain.com/prof.html

Watkins, J.G., & Watkins, H.H. (1997). Ego states theory and therapy. New York, NY:

Norton.

Watkins, J.G. (1971). The affect bridge: A hypnoanalytic technique. The International

Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, XIX, 21-27.

 

DAY 2: (8.5 hours- 1.5 hours break= 7)

 

9.00 am – 10.15 am

Insight-Oriented and Exploratory Hypnotic Techniques – an introduction to hypno-projective techniques including use for trauma.

 

Content:

Discussion of therapeutic considerations/indications for the utilization of insight-oriented and

exploratory hypnotic techniques.

Description and demonstration of hypno-projective techniques (Frazer’s Dissociative Table,

Approach and distancing techniques)

Invitation to experience a hypno-projective technique.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss indications and contraindications for using an insight-oriented hypnotic approach in the exploratory phase of the treatment of trauma and dissociation

  • Describe at least three exploratory hypnotic techniques.

  • Participants will be able to construct a hypno-projective suggestion facilitating approach.

  • Participants will be able to formulate a hypno-projective suggestion facilitating distancing.

References:

Brown, D.P., & Fromm, E. (1986). Hypnotherapy and hypnoanalysis. Hillsdale, NJ:

Lawrence Earlbaum.

Hammond, D.C. (1990). Handbook of hypnotic suggestions and metaphors. New York, NY: Norton.

Martin, K.M. (2012). How to use Fraser's Dissociative Table Technique to access and

work with Emotional Parts of the personality. Journal of EMDR Practice and Research, 6(4), 179-186.

Frederick, C. & McNeal, S. (1998). Inner Strengths: Contemporary Psychotherapy and

Hypnosis for Ego Strengthening. New York: W.W. Norton.

Hunter, M.E. (1994). Creative Scripts for Hypnotherapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel.

 

10:15 to 10:30 am Break

 

10:30 to 12:30 pm

Small Group Practice 2 Enhancing Skills: Utilization & Exploratory Techniques

 

Content: Participants practice techniques to elicit, intensify, utilize, and reorient from

trance. Utilization of ideomotor signaling, metaphors and hypnotic suggestions for ego strengthening.  Faculty and participants will give feedback.

 

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Practice at least once being the facilitator, subject, and observer.

  • Demonstrate at least one intermediate-level elicitation technique.

  • Facilitate deepening of the trance experience.

  • Demonstrate utilization of ideomotor signaling, utilization of metaphors and indirect suggestions for exploration of a resource.

 

References:

Frederick, C. (2014). The center core in ego state therapy and other hypnotically

facilitated psychotherapies. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 56 (2), 39-53.

Howard, H.A. (2017). Promoting safety in hypnosis: a clinical instrument for the

assessment of alertness. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 59 (4), 344-362.

Woody, E., & Sadler, P. (2016). What can a hypnotic induction do? American Journal of

Clinical Hypnosis, 59 (2), 138-154.

 

12:30 to 1:30 Lunch

 

1:30 pm – 3:15 pm

Hypnotic Strategies for Pain Management and Somatic Concerns.

 

Content:

Information on the interplay of physical and emotional pain. Information, demonstration, and

experience of altering physical sensations with hypnosis (hand warming/cooling, controls, etc.) and the importance of ego strengthening suggestions.  Discuss exploratory techniques and hypnotic ways of dealing with unconscious contributing factors as well as contraindications for using clinical hypnosis for pain.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify at least two contraindications for hypnotic pain management.

  • Formulate at least two suggestions for the alteration of sensations.

  • Construct at least two metaphors appropriate for pain management.

  • Demonstrate at least one hypnotic application for exploring contributing factors to pain

 

References:

Jensen, M.P. (2011). Hypnosis for chronic pain management: Therapist Guide. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Palsson, O.S., & Van Tilburg, M. (2015). Hypnosis and guided imagery treatment for

gastrointestinal disorders: Experience with scripted protocols developed at the University of North Carolina. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 58, 15-21.

Patterson, D.R. (2010). Clinical hypnosis for pain control, Washington D.C.: American

Psychological Association.

Vega, de la, R., Mendoza, M.E., Chan, J.F., & Jensen, M.P.(2019). Case Study: Cognitive

restructuring hypnosis for chronic pain in a quadriplegic patient. American Journal of

Clinical Hypnosis, 61, (4), 15-21.

 

3:00 to 3:15 Break

 

3:15 pm – 5:30 pm

Small Group Practice 3:  Hypnotic Pain Management Techniques

 

Content:

Participants practice Intermediate-level techniques to elicit, intensify, utilize, and reorient from

trance. Utilization of ideomotor signaling, metaphors and suggestions for alteration of a

physical sensation. Faculty and participants will give feedback.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Practice at least once being the facilitator, subject, and observer.

  • Demonstrate at least one technique to elicit, intensify, utilize, and reorient from trance.

  • Construct at least two metaphors for alteration of a physical sensation.

  • Formulate suggestions for utilization of ideomotor signaling in the process of pain management.

  • Offer hypnotic application for pain management/enhancing comfort.

References:

Lang, E. (2017). Pain control -acute and procedural. In: G. Elkins (Ed.), Handbook of

Medical and Psychological Hypnosis (pp. 333-340). New York, NY: Springer Publishing.

Meyerson, J. (2017). Self-talk monitoring and utilization for enhancing hypnotic

induction. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 60 (2), 149-158.

Yapko, M.D. (2017). The induction of hypnosis: an invitation to the client to

engage…..deeply. In: M.P. Jensen (Ed.): The Art and Practice of Hypnotic Inductions

(pp.14-32). Denny Creek Press.

Varga, K. (2017). Suggestive techniques without inductions for medical interventions. In:

M.P. Jensen (Ed.): The Art and Practice of Hypnotic Inductions (pp.100-121). Denny

Creek Press.

 

DAY 3 (7.5 hours minus 1.5 break= 6 for a total of 20 hours)

 

9:00 am – 10:30 am

Hypnotic Interventions for Trauma

 

Content: Discussion of hypnotic interventions for phase 1 trauma treatment such as affect regulation, ego strengthening, establishing safety and skills.  Discussion of methods of titration for managing traumatic material via slow leak/fractionated/distancing techniques to assist in gaining sense of mastery of traumatic memories/triggers/emotions.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify two salient features of managing the intensity of hypnotic exploration.

  • Name two hypnotic interventions for resourcing/sense of safety.

  • Formulate at least two suggestions for hypnotic exploration via slow leak techniques.

  • Construct at least two metaphors to support hypnotic exploration within the patient’s window of tolerance.

 

References:

Fine, C. (1991). Treatment stabilization and crisis prevention. Pacing the therapy of the

MPD patient. Psychiatric Clinics of North-America, 14, 661-676.

Kluft, R.P. (1980). On treating the older patient with Multiple Personality Disorder:

“Race against time” or “Make haste slowly?” American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 30(4), 257-266.

Kluft, R.P. (1990a). The fractionated abreactive technique. In: C.D. Hammond (Ed.),

Handbook of hypnotic suggestions and metaphors (pp. 527-528). New York, NY: Norton.

Kluft, R.P. (1990b). The slow leak technique. In: C.D. Hammond (Ed.), Handbook of

hypnotic suggestions and metaphors (pp. 526-527). New York, NY: Norton.

Lemke, W. (2007). Fostering internal cooperation through the use of imagery in the

treatment of dissociative identity disorder. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 8(4), 53-68

 

10:30 to 10:45 Break

 

10:45 am to 12:15 pm

Hypnotic Interventions for Anxiety and Habit Disorders

 

Content: Discussion and demonstration of affect bridge, split screen technique, imaginal

exposure, mental rehearsal, future template/success imagery, hypnosis assisted systematic

desensitization.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify two salient features of hypnosis in affect regulation for anxiety and habit disorders.

  • Name two hypnotic interventions for future template rehearsal.

  • Formulate two hypnotic suggestions for hypnosis assisted systematic desensitization.

  • Construct hypnotic language facilitating an affect bridge.

 

References:

Alladin, A. (2016). Cognitive hypnotherapy for accessing and healing emotional injuries

for anxiety disorders. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 59 (1), 24-46.

Kohen, D.P. (2016). Nail biting. In Gary Elkins (Ed.), Handbook of medical and

psychological hypnosis, foundations applications, and professional issues. New York, NY: Springer.

Yapko, M.D. (2004). Trancework. An introduction to the practice of clinical hypnosis. (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Brunner/Mazel.

Zarren, J.I.& Eimer, B.N., (.,(2002). B.N. Brief cognitive hypnosis. Facilitating the change of dysfunctional behavior. New York, NY: Springer.

Brann, L., Owens, J., Williamson, A., (2011). The Handbook Of Contemporary Clinical

Hypnosis: Theory and Practice. John Wiley & Sons.

 

12:15 to 1:15 pm Lunch

 

1:15 pm to 2:15 pm Working With Children and the Child Within

 

Content:

Adaptation of hypnotic interventions to developmental age of the child / child part. Discussion

of child-specific hypnotic language and strategies. Special considerations of working with child

parts of the personality.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Define at least three ways in which working with children is different from working with adults.

  • Identify at least two hypnotic strategies for the different developmental levels of children and adolescents.

  • Name at least two considerations in working with younger parts of the mind.

  • Construct hypnotic imagery suitable to support self-regulation in children and child-parts of the mind.

 

References:

Anbar, R (Ed.) (2011 June). Special Issue: Pediatric Hypnosis. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 54, 1.

Etzrodt, C. M. (2013). Ethical considerations of therapeutic hypnosis and children.

American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 55 (4), 370-377.

Gregoire, C., Chantrain, C., Faymonville, M.E., Marini, J., & Bragard, I. (2019). A hypnosisbased group intervention to improve quality of life in children with cancer and their parents. The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 67 (2), 117-135.

Kohen, D, Olness, K. (4/2011). Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy with Children. New York, NY:

Routledge.

Kluft, R.P. (2012). Hypnosis in the treatment of Dissociative Identity Disorder and allied

states: an overview and case study. South African Journal of Psychology, 42(2), 146-155.

Spiegel, E. B. (2016). Attachment-focused hypnosis in psychotherapy for complex trauma: attunement, representation, and mentalization. The International Journal of

Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 64 (1), 45-74.

 

2:15 pm to 2:30 pm Break

 

2.30 pm to 3.30 pm

Hypnotic Applications for Sleep

 

Content: Discuss hypnotic applications for sleep as an adjunct to better sleep, as well as concerns to note when addressing sleep concerns. Demonstrate an application for sleep.

 

 Learning Objectives:

  • Identify at least two concerns to address prior to offering hypnotic applications for sleep

  • Utilize one exploratory technique for exploring unconscious contributing factors to sleep difficulties

  • Utilize at least two hypnotic applications to assist in improving sleep

  • Demonstrate the sleep screen application

References:

Anbar, R. D., & Slothower, M. P. (2006). Hypnosis for treatment of insomnia in school-age children: a retrospective chart review. BMC Pediatrics, 6, 23. http://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2431-6-23

Becker PM. Chronic insomnia: outcome of hypnotherapeutic intervention in six cases. Am J Clin Hypnosis. 1993;36:98–105. 

Hauri PJ; Silber MH; Boeve BF. The treatment of parasomnias with hypnosis: a 5-year follow-up study. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(4):369-373.

Lemke, W. (n.d.). Peaceful Mind, Peaceful Sleep [CD]. Mpls, MN: Pickard Studios.

Maren J. Cordi, Angelika A. Schlarb, Björn Rasch  Sleep. 2014 June 1; 37(6): 1143–1152. Published online 2014 June 1. doi: 10.5665/sleep.3778 PMCID: PMC4015388

Paterson, D. C. (1982). Hypnosis: An Alternate Approach to Insomnia.Canadian Family Physician, 28, 768–770.

 

 

 

3.30 pm-4:30 pm

Ethical Integration of Hypnotic Applications into Practice

 

Content: Ethical considerations and applications in the integration of hypnosis into practice through collaborative discussion utilizing case material.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify at least two ethical considerations in offering hypnosis.

  • Identify at least two criteria for whether the use of hypnosis is appropriate.

  • Plan a treatment strategy that incorporates hypnotic applications based on a given case

  • Differentiate when to utilize hypnotic applications for symptom management versus symptom exploration

 

References:

Brand, B. L. & McEwen, L. (2016). Ethical standards, truths and lies. Journal of Trauma &

Dissociation, 17, 259-266. doi: 10.1080/15299732.2016.1114357

Brown, D., Scheflin, A.W., & Hammond, C.D. (1998). Memory, Trauma Treatment, and

the Law. New York, NY: Norton.

Loewenstein, R.J., Brand, B.L., & Gilbert, L., Camins, J., Pyne, Z., & Dressel, C. (October,

2014). Treating complex trauma survivors. Psychiatric Times. Retrieved

from http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/cme/treating-complex-trauma-survivors

Scheflin, A. (1997). Risk management in dissociative disorders and trauma therapy.

Retrieved from http://members.tranquility.net/~rwinkel/CKLN/HTML2/transc19.htm

Scheflin, A.W., & Shapiro, J.L. (1989) Trance on trial. New York, NY: Guilford.

The International Society of Hypnosis (ISH) Code of Ethics (2018).

https://www.ishhypnosis.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/ISH-CODE-OF-ETHICS-final-v4.pdf